Heroic code iliad essay

He could follow an external force, or he could make his own personal decisions. When Achilles kills Hector, he binds his feet to his chariot and drags his body around the walls of Troy. The Homeric hero believed that men had to stand together in battle; men had to respect each other; and they had to refrain from excessive cruelty.

The aim of every hero is to achieve honor. In the Iliad and the Odyssey, the code which administers the Heroic code iliad essay of the Homeric heroes is a straightforward idea. He has no wife: Thus, honor is more important than life itself.

This last condition was critically important for the Homeric hero. Being a hero was a social responsibility that entitled a man to social status, and a warrior defined and justified his social status only on the battlefield. If he acted incorrectly, society would scorn him. Both men are at fault.

In fact, neither Achilles nor Agamemnon recognizes a personal responsibility for their emotional and physical responses, even Heroic code iliad essay both men are on the edge of violence.

When Achilles kills Hector, he binds his feet to his chariot and drags his body around the walls of Troy. Hector, the greatest of the Trojan warriors, begins the poem as a model for a hero.

As a reward for heroic traits in battle, prizes were sometimes awarded to victors of war. This idea derives from the concept that a man became a hero because he possessed certain qualities.

The honor of every person in Homeric culture was important, but to the hero, his honor was paramount. Heroic Code in the Iliad and the Odyssey By: Throughout the Iliad and the Odyssey, different characters take on the role of a hero.

Heroic Code in the Iliad and the Odyssey

He also had to recognize the time when the gods withdrew their help, and at that time the hero had to withdraw from battle. As a reward for heroic traits in battle, prizes were sometimes awarded to victors of war. Patroklos fails because he becomes irrational and allows pride to overcome his reason.

The Homeric community depended upon their heroes to defend its social and religious rites and all other facets of community life.

Honor is essential to the Homeric heroes, so much that life would be meaningless without it. In his soliloquies, the hero speaks to "his own great-hearted spirit" as though it were another person helping him make the right decisions.

He loathed deliberate acts of cruelty and injustice. Among those qualities is heroic balance, which requires a hero to insist upon his greatness and maintain a proper modesty before the gods. Thus, honor is more important than life itself. Throughout the entire Trojan war, Achilles spent most of his time pouting in his tent after Agamemnon kidnapped his prized maiden, Chryseis.

He also lets his best friend, Patroclus, go into battle alone only to die when Hector kills him with his spear.

But in the Iliad the Greeks loved Achilles. For example, when Agamemnon strips Achilles of his war prize, Agamemnon places the responsibility for his actions on Zeus and Destiny. His dedication and firm belief in the code of honor is described many times throughout the course of the Iliad.

In my opinion this was not an act of heroism. His dedication and firm belief in the code of honor is described many times throughout the course of the Iliad.

Nor does the sprit urge me on that way. If he failed to follow the gods and made his own decisions, he had to live with the shame of his mistake, and when he erred, he lost approval and honor.

He also lets his best friend, Patroclus, go into battle alone only to die when Hector kills him with his spear. He says, "It is the god who accomplishes all things" and he claims that "Delusion" entangled him.

In book VI Hector expresses his bravery when Andromache pleads with Hector not to fight when Hector says, "But I would die of shame to face the men of Troy and the Trojan woman trailing their long robes if I would shrink from battle now, a coward. In Book 1 Achilles receives Chryseis as a prize and a symbol of honor.Heroic Code in the Iliad and the Odyssey In Webster's Dictionary, a hero is defined as a person noted for courageous acts or nobility of purpose, especially.

In book 9 of The Iliad, the greatest example of heroes, Achilles, questions in mid-way about the heroic code. However, it is just a shattering start for the process in seeking another point of view about what and how to construct a real hero.

What drives both fighters is the notion of an ambiguous set of noble rules called the "Heroic Code." This set of undefined rules is what Greek and Trojan warriors alike try to utilize when in battle. I will show in this paper that while both Achilles and Hector use the Heroic Code to shape their decisions, they act in distinctly different ways.3/5(3).

The heroes in The Iliad follow Homer’s heroic code, striving for excellence. Hector and Achilles’ strength comes from their desire for fame, glory, honor and their acceptance of fate. These qualities are considered to be characteristics of Homer’s heroic code.

Heroic Code Essay - The characters in Homer’s Iliad follow the Heroic Code which is all about honor. For them, honor is the most important thing and a person who dies without honor is worth nothing. To be someone honorable, one must standout from the army, like Akhilleus and Hektor.

Heroic Code in the Iliad and the Odyssey Essay Heroic Code in the Iliad and the Odyssey In Webster's Dictionary, a hero is defined as a person noted for courageous acts or nobility of purpose, especially if this individual has risked or sacrificed his life.

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Heroic code iliad essay
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